Writing: Less is More

Cutting unnecessary words is a great way to improve your public communication writing. I think of it as panning for gold. Your message is the precious metal; the unnecessary words are the muddy water. Removing them gives your ideas space to shine.

How do we know when words serve no purpose are purposeless?

One thing to look for is empty phrases that add no extra meaning.

Basically, some of these are really sort of like verbal tics you know? These verbal tics are helpful when producing writing dialogue or employing a casual tone, but otherwise they are just useless bulk. In long texts they build up like dirt on a window and obscure the view.

He was sort of unhappy because she had kind of lied about losing the dog.

He went to the park where he began to looked for the dog. Suddenly he saw a wagging tail in the bushes. He was just so happy to see Benji. 

Another thing to look for is information that is repeated or already pretty obvious.

He asked the question whether anybody had seen his dog. (We already know it’s a question because of the word “asked.”)

Here’s an majorly exaggerated example of a paragraph that could do with being very   be significantly shorter.

The high school teacher taught classes of history to high school students at Washington high school. She had worked as a high school teacher teaching history at the high school since 1990. She enjoyed working with student groups in lessons. It was a process that made her feel joy, euphoria and happiness.

The high school teacher taught classes of history to high school students at Washington high school. She had worked as a high school teacher teaching taught history at the high school there since 1990. She enjoyed working with students groups in lessons. It was a The process that made her happy feel joy, euphoria and happiness.

So there we have it. Public communication writing is clearer and more accessible when we remove the unnecessarily wordy verbiage.

B09B9B7B-BA79-4EB6-8FE1-E47A8384B532

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s